Monday, May 14, 2012

Every Dollar Makes a Difference

Some times when thinking about our debt or savings goals it may seem impossible. But by breaking it down into manageable amounts can make it easier to conquer. Some people think a dollar or two doesn’t matter. Even small amounts added up over time can make a difference. One suggestion from Suze Orman is to always break your dollars instead of spending your change. Then save the change. This is more difficult to do now with many more people using their credit cards and debit cards more than cash. Some banks and credit cards are offering “round up” programs. You can sign up for the program and when you use your debit card or credit card, your purchase will be rounded up to the next dollar amount and the extra will be deposited into your account. It may seem like a small change but over time could add up.


Following is part of a story I received recently showing the power of saving small amounts.

The pickle jar as far back as I can remember sat on the floor beside the dresser in my parents' bedroom. When he got ready for bed, Dad would empty his pockets and toss his coins into the jar. As a small boy, I was always fascinated at the sounds the coins

made as they were dropped into the jar. I used to squat on the floor in front of the jar to admire the copper and silver circles that glinted like a pirate's treasure when the sun poured through the bedroom window. When the jar was filled, Dad would sit at the kitchen table and roll the coins before taking them to the bank. Taking the coins to the bank was always a big production. Each and every time, as we drove to the bank, Dad would look at me hopefully. 'Those coins are going to keep you out of the textile mill, son. Also, each and every time, as he slid the box of rolled coins across the counter at the bank toward the cashier, he would grin proudly. 'These are for my son's college fund’. No matter how rough things got at home, Dad continued to doggedly drop his coins into the jar. Even the summer when Dad got laid off from the mill, and Mama had to serve dried beans several times a week, not a single dime was taken from the jar. To the contrary, as Dad looked across the table at me, pouring catsup over my beans to make them more palatable, he became more determined than ever to make a way out for me 'When you finish college, Son,' he told me, his eyes glistening, 'You'll never have to eat beans again - unless you want to.' The years passed, and I finished college and took a job in another town. Once, while visiting my parents, I used the phone in their bedroom, and noticed that the pickle jar was gone. It had served its purpose and had been removed. When I married, I told my wife Susan about the significant part the lowly pickle jar had played in my life as a boy. The first Christmas after our daughter Jessica was born, we spent the holiday with my parents. After dinner, Mom and Dad sat next to each other on the sofa, taking turns cuddling their first grandchild. Jessica began to whimper softly, and Susan took her from Dad's arms. 'She probably needs to be changed,' she said, carrying the baby into my parents' bedroom to diaper her. When Susan came back into the living room, there was a strange mist in her eyes. She handed Jessica back to Dad before taking my hand and leading me into the room. 'Look,' she said softly, her eyes directing me to a spot on the floor beside the dresser. To my amazement, there, as if it had never been removed, stood the old pickle jar, the bottom already covered with coins.



1 comment:

  1. That’s a good concept. Thank you very much ! See you at bep gas

    ReplyDelete